Civil War Life in Richmond- Mike Gorman

Grace St Overlook LOC

 

Bell Isle Stereograph LOCRichmond has often been called a Civil War town, but how much do we know about the average Richmonder during the tumultuous 4 years that were the Civil War?  This is the first of a series new periodic series called Civil War Life in Richmond.  The series will examine what it would be like for civilians to live in RVA.  This first episode features Historian and Park Guide from the National Park Service Mike Gorman.  Gorman was on episode 10 Lincoln in Richmond.

St Pauls Stereograph

Topics rang from how the newspapers covered daily life in RVA to the reaction to already having a city government, housing the Virginia state government and then mixing in a federal government that was housed in the same building as the state government.

Mike Gorman maintains a fantastic website with a great mount of information about Civil War Richmond.  It can be found at mdgorman.com

Subscribe or listen to History Replays Today, The Richmond History Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Tunein, or another podcast manager.

 

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14 GWAR/ Bob Gorman

GWAR

GWAR

Some people may find some of the topics objectionable.

Bob Gorman, Courtesy of Bob Gorman

Bob Gorman

Bob Gorman is the Secretary and the Shop Foreman for the Richmond based, Slave Pit Inc., which is, better know as the metal band GWAR.  GWAR is much more than band.  Its a 28 year old multimedia art collective that is know for its stage show as much as its music. The group floats somewhere between musical theater, professional wrestling, and a live horror movie.  The narrative or mythos of the band is always changing but is basically, a group of aliens sent to earth as a punishment only to be trapped in the ice of Antarctica.  They would then be freed by global warming and discovered by a music producer.  They now travel the world playing music and fighting their enemies.

Bonecrusher, played by Bob Gorman

Bonesnapper, played by Bob Gorman

For more than 25 years Gorman has been making monsters, playing characters on stage, and acting as GWAR’s historian.  As well as continuing his work with GWAR, Gorman is currently working on a documentary and coffee table book about the group.  In this conversation with host Jeff Majer Gorman discusses the humble origins of GWAR in a run down building, their run-ins with the law, one of which ended up getting the ACLU involved, the groups two Grammy nominations, why they were turned away from the Grammies, the unexpected death of their long time guitar player Cory Smoot that resulted from a preexisting condition and a lot more.

 

Bob Gorman working at the Slave Pit

Bob Gorman working at the Slave Pit

GWAR has just released their 13th studio album Battle Maximus, and will be going on tour in Australia in February and then will be making their first trip to Japan in early 2014.  To find out more information about GWAR where to buy their new album Battle Maximus, where to see the show or how to donate to the Cory Smoot foundation go to GWAR.NET.

All photos are courtesy of Bob Gorman.

 

 

In this episode Free University is discussed, for more information on Free University listen to the episode with Dale Brumfield and Richmond’s Independent Press.

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Subscribe or listen to History Replays Today, The Richmond History Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Tunein, or another podcast manager.

 

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Gorman from the film “Phallus in Wonderland”

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13 Bill Martin/The Valentine Richmond History Center

The Wickham House where The Valentine opened, seen after 1933. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

The Wickham House where The Valentine opened, seen after 1933. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

On this episode, Bill Martin, The Director of The Valentine Richmond History Center discusses the history of The Valentine, which is the oldest museum in Richmond.  The museum opened its doors in 1898 in the Wickham House on the corner of Clay and 11th St.  Over the years the museum has gone through many changes as RVA and its needs for a museum have changed, including expansion.  The museum now takes up the entire block of East Grace St between 10th & 11th Streets.  Martin also tells History Replays Today about the current renovations of the museums main galleries.  The renovation is allowing Martin and The Valentine to reexamine what its means to live in a city like Richmond, that is layered with history and how that history should be taught and related to.

The Valentine Richmond History Center is a must visit for any one that wants to know anything about Richmond. ¬†The museum (like this podcast) focuses on ALL of Richmond’s history not just the Civil War. ¬†In fact¬†Martin lays out why the Civil War may not even be the most important time in RVA’s history.

The Wickham House and Edward Valentine’s Studio remain open through out the renovation. ¬†The renovations progress can be monitored every Wednesday at the “Hard Hat Happy Hour”. ¬†The Valentine’s Community Discussions will also continue. ¬†Find out more information on the Valentine’s calendar of events.

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